Artifact Theory

We do not know the author of this guide to finding artifacts.  If the author would come forward, we’d be more than happy to give proper attribution

— The Librarian

First I would like to thank the Factions of Amananth and Hyperial for providing the technologies used to recover artifacts from the wreckage scattered about the sectors of known space. Secondly, I would like to thank the pilots of the Factions Octavius, Solarian, and Quantar for the empirical evidence on which I based my premises, as well as efforts to test my theories in practice.

Basic Assumptions: There are differences in opinion as to the validity of some of these assumption, and all I can say is that I have found no evidence to contradict my basic assumptions. Others have different opinions, but these are often based on their personal results and can be chalked up to luck, or fate. I assume that all sectors are the same with regard to location of wreckage, that no special treatment is necessary for different sectors. I assume that wreckage is always found between 90k and 100k from the gate at rotacol 0 0 0. I assume further that there is no reason to believe that one region of this shell is more likely than any other (I will explain why this is not the case later.)

Single pilot patterns.

Most ‘fact finders are solitary. It’s part of the human condition. I will address a number of single pilot strategies, but first let me expound on ethics. If any search pattern (without 100% chance of success) becomes standard, each sector will eventually have wreckage found in the spots that the pattern misses. If this continues, eventually all sectors will be set so that the search pattern will fail in all sectors. This effect may be responsible for pilot claims that they can’t find artifacts using a search pattern. They just are using a pattern that has failed in the past, and will continue to fail. Hence, pilots should vary their search patterns, or adopt a policy of occasionally adopting a 100% pattern to search out the really hard to find ones. I also assume you are using a 40k radar. You have almost twice the coverage over 35k radar. I don’t advise even trying with only 35k worth of coverage… but some do.

The first search pattern is the one I have had best results with. No rotacol is needed. Simply fly to a distance of 90k (some use less) and fly perpendicular to the direction to the 000 gate maintaining distance. If you get tired of one direction, turn 90 degrees and continue maintaining distance from 000. The danger is that there is no end in sight. You could fly for hours and hours and miss the fact. That said, this is how I have found the best stuff I have. I call this the “Random Search”

The second is a pattern I rarely use, though I have tested. You need a rotacol and it’s success rate is moderate. It’s advantage is that it is manageable and relatively fast. It also terminates, often without an artifact, but it ends. The task can also be split between two pilots. It is a simplified version of the multiple point techniques presented later. The plan is to visit in this order [55 55 55], [-55 55 55], [-55 -55 55], [55 -55 55], [55 -55 -55], [-55 -55 -55], [-55 55 -55], [55 55 -55]. You can actually start at any of the eight points and you can choose a higher or lower number (some use 60, some 52… I choose 55 because it’s easy to enter, and about right. You will want to use a higher number if you have a 35k radar). If no artifact is discovered, you have two choices: go to another sector, or try [90 0 0], [0 90 0 ], [-90 0 0], [0 0 90], [0 -90 0], and [0 0 -90] in that order. This is still not 100% coverage even with 40k radar, but helps. This has been dubbed the “Cube Search”.

The third type of pattern is a 100% positive search if carried out correctly. It is surprisingly short, shorter than the Cube Search with the visits to the [90 0 0] type points. I will call these “Torus Patterns” (A torus is the mathematical term for a doughnut). For the 40k radar, begin by traveling to [0 0 90]. Then set your rotacol at [58 0 58] and travel there. Once there set your rotacol to [0 0 58] and travel in a circle maintaining a third component of 58 and a distance of 58 from the rotacol. When you arrive back at [58 0 58] set your rotacol to [83 0 0] and circle about [0 0 0] maintaining a third component of 0. When back to [83 0 0] set rotacol to [58 0 -58] and circle [0 0 -58] at a distance of 58. Finally after completing that circle, travel to [0 0 -90]. This covers 100% of the shell with some room for human error. It does a pretty good job with 35k radar too. For complete coverage with 35k radar you should do [0 0 90], circle [0 0 65] at radius 45, circle [0 0 25] at radius 80, circle [0 0 -25] at radius 80, circle [0 0 65] at radius 45 and travel to [0 0 -90]. These are high maintenance patterns, requiring attention to rotacol and are not easy to perform. They always work though if done properly. These patterns make nice 2 pilot patterns as one pilot can start at [0 0 90] an work down and the other at [0 0 -90] and work up. Three pilots can divide the chore too, one taking the large torus centered at [0 0 0] and the other two taking the smaller paths and [0 0 90] or [0 0 -90]

Multiple pilot patterns

I have found that multiple pilot patterns are doomed if the number of pilots is too high. There is an unexplained phenomenon of space that teleports a pilot back to his home station and leaves him there, unable to communicate for some time. During this time, his search team members are relying on him to cover his area of space. It just doesn’t work unless you assign multiple pilots the same area. The idea is sound… position 20 or so pilots about the shell and you can have near complete coverage (with 40k radar… the number is closer to 40 with 35k radars). Using Amananth computers (OOC: http://www.csun.edu/~hcmth007/points.html) I have computed the following point distributions and assigned pilots points in the shell to cover. Ideally there would be a pilot at each point, but that is a pipedream. There is little difference in the coverage between 18 and 25 points. Adding more points creates more overlap, so adding points becomes less and less productive. I provide different numbers to make fair distribution of space easier. You may choose to scale these points down to be closer to [0 0 0], but it really doesn’t shorten the individual paths that much, and you lose coverage. As pilots complete their coverage, each should adopt a Random Search Pattern until they, or someone in the search party, finds the artifact.

Based on 18 points: These points are about 72k apart so 35k radar will leave significant gaps

Six pilot plan:

Pilot 1: [0 0 90] [-18 -64 61] [64 -18 61]
Pilot 2: [18 64 61] [-43 77 18] [24 85 -18]
Pilot 3: [-64 18 61] [-77 -43 18] [-85 24 -18]
Pilot 4: [43 -77 18] [-24 -85 -18] [33 -58 -61]
Pilot 5: [77 43 18] [85 -24 -18] [58 33 -61]
Pilot 6: [0 0 -90] [-58 -33 -61] [-33 58 -61]

Nine pilot plan: Same points as Six, but two spots each

Pilot 1: [0 0 90] [-18 -64 61]
Pilot 2: [-64 18 61] [-77 -43 18]
Pilot 3: [18 64 61] [-43 77 18]
Pilot 4: [64 -18 61] [77 43 18]
Pilot 5: [43 -77 18] [85 -24 -18]
Pilot 6: [24 85 -18] [58 33 -61]
Pilot 7: [-24 -85 -18] [33 -58 -61]
Pilot 8: [-85 24 -18] [-33 58 -61]
Pilot 9: [-58 -33 -61] [0 0 -90]

With 18 Pilots, one on a spot and 40k radar, the shell is almost totally covered. With 35k there are significant gaps.

Based on 20 points: Still significant gaps with 35K radar.

Five pilots: 4 spots each. Note. This arrangement is not “fair” Some pilots have larger areas than others. No fair distribution of points was clear on analysis. Some are more square than others. I would suggest rotation of pilot number each secession.

Pilot 1: [0 0 90] [57 -38 59] [-6 -90 -6] [-9 -66 -61]
Pilot 2: [-65 0 63] [-68 -56 20] [-87 0 -21] [-68 56 20]
Pilot 3: (40k) [-9 66 61] [-6 90 -6] [62 66 -7] [57 38 59]
Pilot 4: (35k) [-51 52 -53] [-51 -52 -53] [-17 0 -88] [23 56 -67]
Pilot 5: [90 0 4] [65 0 -63] [23 -56 -67] [61 -66 -7]

Ten pilots: 2 spots:

Pilot 1: [0 0 90] [57 -38 59]
Pilot 2: [-6 -90 -6] [-9 -66 -61]
Pilot 3: [-65 0 63] [-68 -56 20]
Pilot 4: [-87 0 -21] [-68 56 20]
Pilot 5: [62 66 -7] [57 38 59]
Pilot 6: [-9 66 61] [-6 90 -6]
Pilot 7: [-51 52 -53] [-51 -52 -53]
Pilot 8: [-17 0 -88] [23 56 -67]
Pilot 9: [90 0 4] [65 0 -63]
Pilot 10: [23 -56 -67] [61 -66 -7]
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